Thoughts, Ideas, and Concepts by Sandra Parks

Posts tagged ‘Education’

How to Handle ‘You’re Overqualified’ in Interviews

So  what should you do if you’re credentialed with good experience and advanced  education, are looking to become re-employed and are even willing to take a  lower-level position? Here are a few tips:

Don’t  Be Tempted to “Dumb Down!”

This  strategy moves your career backward. You typically end up frustrated, not hired  or worse — you find a new job you can’t wait to move out of. Most employers  today actually want you working at your highest ability level since productivity  is key to everyone’s success. They also want to retain you past the many months  it takes to train you for the job, so you can begin to make a contribution to  the company.

Do Some Soul Searching and Savvy Preparation.

Acknowledge  that employers are reluctant to hire a person who is overqualified because they  think the person is unlikely to be happy, won’t stay long, might want the  interviewer’s job or may expect fast promotion. Remember that you can be  threatening to the interviewer, especially if you are truly suited for the  interviewer’s job! He may think you aren’t seriously interested in doing the job  for which you’re being hired — nor do employers want someone who’s burned out or  sees the job as an easy paycheck.

Examine  why you want the position. “I need a job!” is not a response that will endear  you to him. You must use your communication skills to convince him why a  demotion is a good option. You must create a reasonable explanation. Try  this:

“My  current position as Regional Sales Manager requires me to cover 14 states, and  the job had grown into 15 nights of travel per month. This has become an  increasingly difficult sacrifice for my family. I have decided to seek a major  accounts-rep position that allows me to focus on my strengths — selling,  sustaining top-notch client relationships and up-selling — but also allows me to  go home most evenings. This is not an option at my current job. It requires a  lot of out-of-town travel to do the job, which I am no longer willing to do. I  believe my extensive marketing and sales skills would greatly benefit your  organization in a positive way. I see this as a win/win situation for both of  us.”

Don’t  Show Desperation.

You  may feel it, but it will work against your getting hired if you show how frantic  you are to get a job. Too often an executive says, “I’ll start at any job just  to get my foot in the door.” That won’t work — it’s an outdated strategy. Being  willing to take any  job often makes the interviewer disqualify you. She needs a competent  person to perform the specific job she’s hiring for.

So,  you must show not only that you can do it but also that you want
to do
it. You can offer some advantages, gained from your experience, such
as: “My ability to solve problems and train others would be a major plus in the  position.” Many employers are slow to hire, yet pay well when they select
someone for the position, so patience is essential.

Look  Harder for Positions for Which You Are Qualified.

Employers  want a good fit and an individual who delivers results. Customize every cover letter you write and tweak your resume to match the
opportunity. Be sure to address the major needs required and demonstrate results  you’ve achieved in line with the level requested. A former CEO at a smaller  company might only be a midlevel executive at a larger organization, so be clear  as to how you’re leveraging past experience and leadership to help a potential  employer excel.

Networking  Is Key to Hearing About and Landing a New Job.

Ask  colleagues, friends, former employees, college alumni, and other contacts for  referrals to new people who can help you uncover unadvertised positions. An  introduction to a senior executive can open new doors and even create a job when  no advertised one was available. Department of Labor statistics reveal that 63  percent of all jobs last year were found through contacts, so network, network,  NETWORK!

Networking Is Your Status Update Still ‘Looking for Work?’

Networking

Lately I’ve been reading a lot of status updates on business and social networking sites that say things like, “Project Manager professional looking for work” or “Looking for work in a tough economy” or “Just received my degree in accounting — looking for work.” While I understand that these job seekers are trying to advertise their candidacy online, I don’t recommend broadcasting this specific message in your status updates. Here’s why:

  1. Blasting this message to your entire network makes you look desperate. You might as well rent a billboard to promote your job search … Yes, I know there are stories about people landing a job this way, but these tactics get old fast. (And by the way, the guy who landed a job by wearing a sandwich board saying he was looking for work is “so 2008.”)
  2. Posting this message makes people in your network uncomfortable. Imagine agreeing to meet someone for coffee and before the coffee is even cool enough to drink you say, “I’m looking for work.” It’s awkward. It places an unrealistic expectation on your contacts to come up with a solution for you. The same thing happens online when you announce that you are looking for work.
  3. Sending this message leaves you little wiggle room for a follow-up message. Think about it. If you are still in a job search next week, what will your status update be? “Still looking for work” isn’t going to cut it.

Status updates on business and social-networking platforms like Facebook and LinkedIn are a way for you to build rapport with a community and deepen the relationship with your contacts. Choose messages that showcase your expertise, share valuable information, give kudos to others or broadcast an exciting endeavor you are working on (even if it is volunteer work). Here are some examples of alternative status updates you might want to adapt for your situation:

For a fundraising executive:

  • “Volunteering at the American Cancer Society walkathon on Sunday; hope to raise more than $2M.”

 

For an HR professional: 

  • “Attending a seminar on compensation plans for 2009 and beyond at (share the link)”

For an advertising professional: 

  • “My colleague, John Smith, just landed a major account with a leading luxury goods company. Way to go, John!”

For a CIO: 

  • ”Reading an interesting article on new technologies in health care at (share the link)”

For a financial analyst: 

  • “Boning up on study materials for the CFA Level II exam … looks like it’s going to be a long night!” 

Create status updates that invite questions and further conversation, not ones that make your network run for cover. Remember, online networking, like face-to-face networking, is a process. Whenever possible, give before you get and you will be surprised how quickly you get something back in return.

Word Of The Day

Here is your word of the day.  Enjoy and don’t forget to leave your sentence.

karuna (KUH-roo-na) noun

  Loving compassion.

[From Sanskrit karuna (compassion).]

  “Once we experience and feel this inter-dependence of all living beings,
  we will cease to hurt, humiliate, exploit and kill another. We will want
  to free all sentient beings from suffering. This is karuna, compassion,
  which in turn gives rise to the responsibility to create happiness and
  its causes for all.”

WORD OF THE DAY

Here is the word for the day.  Enjoy and remember to post your sentences.  Thanks

identic (eye-DEN-tik) adjective

  1. Relating to a diplomatic action in which two or more governments
      agree to follow the same course in relations with another government.

  2. Identical.

[From Latin identicus (identical).]

WORD OF THE DAY

Sorry I’m late on the word of the day.  But never the less here it is.  Enjoy!!!!  Don’t forget to leave a sentence. 

diurnation (dy-uhr-NAY-shuhn) noun

  The habit of sleeping or being dormant during the day.

[From Latin diurnus (daily), from dies (day).]

WORD OF THE DAY

As promised here is your word of the day.  Enjoy and don’t forget to use the word daily in your every day conversation and also leave a sentence.  Thanks

balbriggan (bal-BRIG-uhn) noun

  A knitted, unbleached cotton fabric, used in hosiery and underwear.

[After Balbriggan, a town near Dublin in Ireland, where it was first made.]

WORD OF THE DAY

Ok my syber face friends and family, I need participation.  Thanks for stopping by.  My numbers show that you are stopping by but when you stop by please leave your comments.  Here goes today’s word of the day.  Leave a sentence as your comment.

The sharper the point of the needle, the more easily it goes through. The thinner the blade of the sword, the more swiftly it cuts through.  Often the same goes for words.

cairn (kairn) noun

  A heap of stones set up as a landmark or a memorial.

[From Scottish Gaelic carn (pile of stones).]

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